September272013

sinobug:

Crane Fly (Pselliophora/Ctenophora sp., Tipulidae, Diptera)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Beijing, China

See more Chinese flies on my Flickr site HERE…..

September92013

astronomy-to-zoology:

Pachyloidellus goliath

…a species of tropical harvestman that is native to Argentina in South America.  P.goliath is mainly active at night and is a generalist predator and has been observed feeding mostly on earthworms and a variety small insects. Like other harvestmen species when threatened P.goliath can secrete a defensive secretion which produces a strong odor in attempt to deter potential predators.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Arthropoda-Chelicerata-Arachnida-Opiliones-Grassatores-Gonyleptidae-Pachyloidellus-P.goliath

Images: Glauco Machado and Jovengandalf

(via rhamphotheca)

September72013

Tasmanian Live-bearing Seastar (Parvulastra vivipara) - Requested by Anonymous

The Tasmanian Live-bearing Seastar is a tiny, uniformly orange-yellow seastar, up to 15 mm across. It is endemic to south-east Tasmania. Parvulastra broods juvenile starfish in a brood chamber (aka “live birth” aka viviparity). That, is the adult “carries” either internally or externally several tiny juvenile starfish with it until they are ready to move off on their own as full adults.

But what motivates the exit? Those juvenile starfish are cannibals! So, as soon as the brooded juveniles develop a mouth they begin feeding on their siblings in the body cavity! Byrne speculated on one reason that juveniles may vacate in order to avoid being fed upon by their larger siblings. Thanks to the intragonadal cannibalism however, sometimes you get a really big one which continues to grow inside the parent. Ultimately reaching a size at which it cannot physically escape on its own.

(Source: echinoblog.blogspot.com)

8AM

Spider-tailed Horned Viper (Pseudocerastes urarachnoides)

In 1968, the Second Street Expedition across Iran collected what appeared to be a Persian Horned Viper with a Wind Scorpion attached to its tail. Examination of the specimen in 1970 revealed the apparent arachnid was actually a growth, but it could not be determined if it was some sort of reaction to a parasite, a tumor, or caused by genetics. A second specimen bearing a pseudo-arachnid was captured in 2001, and it became apparent that an entire species possessed this trait — Pseudocerastes urarachnoides (Bostanchi et al. 2006). Two live specimens were collected in 2008 and the tails were filmed in action.

An unnervingly convincing Wind Scorpion probably doesn’t seem very appealing to most humans but Bostanchi et al. (2006) hypothesized the heavily modified tails are used as lures.

(Source: biologicalmarginalia.wordpress.com)

September62013

Oarfish (Regalecus glesne) - Requested by Anonymous

The strange-looking oarfish is the longest bony fish in the sea. The origin of the oarfish name is unknown, but may refer to the oar-shaped body or the long, oar-like pelvic fins. Because of its long, thin shape, the oarfish fish is sometimes known as the ribbonfish. It is also commonly referred to as the king of herrings.

Even though it is a deep water species, it is not too uncommon to see an oarfish. These unusual creatures have been known to wash ashore on beaches after storms, providing endless hours of fascination for curious onlookers. They also have a habit of floating near the surface of the water when they are sick or dying. Because of this, it is believed that the oarfish may be responsible for many of the legendary sightings of sea monsters and sea serpents by ancient mariners and beach goers.

Although it is fished for sport as a game fish, the oarfish is not usually fished commercially because its gelatinous flesh is not considered edible.

(Source: seasky.org)

8AM

Cobalt Blue Tarantula (Haplopelma lividum) - Requested by salticid

The Cobalt Blue Tarantula is one of the more beautiful, yet one of the more aggressive species of tarantula. Cobalt Blue Tarantulas are extremely aggressive and fast. Even the spiderlings of this species have been known to show aggression! These tarantulas spin large webs even though they do spend most of their time in their burrow if given the opportunity.

As the name implies the females (top) of the species have bright blue legs. The carapace and abdomen are usually a brownish color. Males (bottom) of this species are reported as all brown in color.

Haplopelma lividum are native to Southeast Asia tropical forests of Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam.

4AM

flygex-eatin-on-softies:

Since people are flipping their shit over croc skinks, allow me to introduce you to one of my favorite reptiles.

This is Cerastes Cerastes, or the desert horned viper, and I believe, is just as much a “dragon” as the croc skink.

  • They’re sidewinders
  • They live in North Africa and the Middle East
  • They burrow their chubby bodies beneath the sand and poke their eyes and horns out cutely
  • Sometimes they don’t have horns at all!
  • They are adorable and smushy and I want to kiss them all! 

(via tortle)

September12013
kroeghes-bag-of-holding:

Freshly molted House Centipede. Photography by Nicky Bay.

kroeghes-bag-of-holding:

Freshly molted House Centipede. Photography by Nicky Bay.

(via realmonstrosities)

August222013
realmonstrosities:

scienceyoucanlove:

#8. Skeleton Shrimp 
Look closely to see these tiny skeleton shrimp clinging to bryozoans, hydroids oralgae. Their body shape and color help the shrimp to blend into their background. Their bodies are long, cylindrical and range from pale brown and green to rose. Some species can quickly change color to blend into their backgrounds.
Skeleton shrimp look like, and sometimes are called, “praying mantises of the sea.” They have two pairs of legs attached to the front end of their bodies, with three pairs of legs at the back end. The front legs form powerful “claws” for defense, grooming and capturing food. The rear legs have strong claws that grasp and hold on to algae or other surfaces. They use their antennae for filter feeding and swimming.
Shrimp, sea anemones and surfperch prey on skeleton shrimp. The females of some skeleton shrimp species kill the male after mating. Skeleton shrimp use their front legs for locomotion. To move, they grasp first with those front legs and then with their back legs, in inchworm fashion. They swim by rapidly bending and straightening their bodies. 
To grow, skeleton shrimp shed their old exoskeletons and form new, larger ones. They can mate only when the female is between new, hardened exoskeletons. After mating, the female deposits her eggs in a brood pouch formed from leaflike projections on the middle part of her body. Skeleton shrimp hatch directly into juvenile adults.
source 

One of my favourites!

realmonstrosities:

scienceyoucanlove:

#8. Skeleton Shrimp 

Look closely to see these tiny skeleton shrimp clinging to bryozoans, hydroids oralgae. Their body shape and color help the shrimp to blend into their background. Their bodies are long, cylindrical and range from pale brown and green to rose. Some species can quickly change color to blend into their backgrounds.

Skeleton shrimp look like, and sometimes are called, “praying mantises of the sea.” They have two pairs of legs attached to the front end of their bodies, with three pairs of legs at the back end. The front legs form powerful “claws” for defense, grooming and capturing food. The rear legs have strong claws that grasp and hold on to algae or other surfaces. They use their antennae for filter feeding and swimming.

Shrimp, sea anemones and surfperch prey on skeleton shrimp. The females of some skeleton shrimp species kill the male after mating. Skeleton shrimp use their front legs for locomotion. To move, they grasp first with those front legs and then with their back legs, in inchworm fashion. They swim by rapidly bending and straightening their bodies.

To grow, skeleton shrimp shed their old exoskeletons and form new, larger ones. They can mate only when the female is between new, hardened exoskeletons. After mating, the female deposits her eggs in a brood pouch formed from leaflike projections on the middle part of her body. Skeleton shrimp hatch directly into juvenile adults.

source 

One of my favourites!

August32013
archiemcphee:

This awesome creature is a Leptocephalus and it might just be the most perfectly transparent animal we’ve ever seen. According to all-knowing virtual guru that is Wikipedia, “Leptocephalus (meaning “slim head”) is the flat and transparent larva of the eel, marine eels, and other members of the Superorder Elopomorpha.”
We think they might also be secret underwater superheroes. 
Photo from the Mie Prefecture Fisheries Institute
[via TYWKIWDBI]

archiemcphee:

This awesome creature is a Leptocephalus and it might just be the most perfectly transparent animal we’ve ever seen. According to all-knowing virtual guru that is Wikipedia, “Leptocephalus (meaning “slim head”) is the flat and transparent larva of the eel, marine eels, and other members of the Superorder Elopomorpha.”

We think they might also be secret underwater superheroes. 

Photo from the Mie Prefecture Fisheries Institute

[via TYWKIWDBI]

(via graphicareferencia)