September62013

Cobalt Blue Tarantula (Haplopelma lividum) - Requested by salticid

The Cobalt Blue Tarantula is one of the more beautiful, yet one of the more aggressive species of tarantula. Cobalt Blue Tarantulas are extremely aggressive and fast. Even the spiderlings of this species have been known to show aggression! These tarantulas spin large webs even though they do spend most of their time in their burrow if given the opportunity.

As the name implies the females (top) of the species have bright blue legs. The carapace and abdomen are usually a brownish color. Males (bottom) of this species are reported as all brown in color.

Haplopelma lividum are native to Southeast Asia tropical forests of Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam.

4AM

flygex-eatin-on-softies:

Since people are flipping their shit over croc skinks, allow me to introduce you to one of my favorite reptiles.

This is Cerastes Cerastes, or the desert horned viper, and I believe, is just as much a “dragon” as the croc skink.

  • They’re sidewinders
  • They live in North Africa and the Middle East
  • They burrow their chubby bodies beneath the sand and poke their eyes and horns out cutely
  • Sometimes they don’t have horns at all!
  • They are adorable and smushy and I want to kiss them all! 

(via tortle)

September12013
kroeghes-bag-of-holding:

Freshly molted House Centipede. Photography by Nicky Bay.

kroeghes-bag-of-holding:

Freshly molted House Centipede. Photography by Nicky Bay.

(via realmonstrosities)

August222013
realmonstrosities:

scienceyoucanlove:

#8. Skeleton Shrimp 
Look closely to see these tiny skeleton shrimp clinging to bryozoans, hydroids oralgae. Their body shape and color help the shrimp to blend into their background. Their bodies are long, cylindrical and range from pale brown and green to rose. Some species can quickly change color to blend into their backgrounds.
Skeleton shrimp look like, and sometimes are called, “praying mantises of the sea.” They have two pairs of legs attached to the front end of their bodies, with three pairs of legs at the back end. The front legs form powerful “claws” for defense, grooming and capturing food. The rear legs have strong claws that grasp and hold on to algae or other surfaces. They use their antennae for filter feeding and swimming.
Shrimp, sea anemones and surfperch prey on skeleton shrimp. The females of some skeleton shrimp species kill the male after mating. Skeleton shrimp use their front legs for locomotion. To move, they grasp first with those front legs and then with their back legs, in inchworm fashion. They swim by rapidly bending and straightening their bodies. 
To grow, skeleton shrimp shed their old exoskeletons and form new, larger ones. They can mate only when the female is between new, hardened exoskeletons. After mating, the female deposits her eggs in a brood pouch formed from leaflike projections on the middle part of her body. Skeleton shrimp hatch directly into juvenile adults.
source 

One of my favourites!

realmonstrosities:

scienceyoucanlove:

#8. Skeleton Shrimp 

Look closely to see these tiny skeleton shrimp clinging to bryozoans, hydroids oralgae. Their body shape and color help the shrimp to blend into their background. Their bodies are long, cylindrical and range from pale brown and green to rose. Some species can quickly change color to blend into their backgrounds.

Skeleton shrimp look like, and sometimes are called, “praying mantises of the sea.” They have two pairs of legs attached to the front end of their bodies, with three pairs of legs at the back end. The front legs form powerful “claws” for defense, grooming and capturing food. The rear legs have strong claws that grasp and hold on to algae or other surfaces. They use their antennae for filter feeding and swimming.

Shrimp, sea anemones and surfperch prey on skeleton shrimp. The females of some skeleton shrimp species kill the male after mating. Skeleton shrimp use their front legs for locomotion. To move, they grasp first with those front legs and then with their back legs, in inchworm fashion. They swim by rapidly bending and straightening their bodies.

To grow, skeleton shrimp shed their old exoskeletons and form new, larger ones. They can mate only when the female is between new, hardened exoskeletons. After mating, the female deposits her eggs in a brood pouch formed from leaflike projections on the middle part of her body. Skeleton shrimp hatch directly into juvenile adults.

source 

One of my favourites!

August32013
archiemcphee:

This awesome creature is a Leptocephalus and it might just be the most perfectly transparent animal we’ve ever seen. According to all-knowing virtual guru that is Wikipedia, “Leptocephalus (meaning “slim head”) is the flat and transparent larva of the eel, marine eels, and other members of the Superorder Elopomorpha.”
We think they might also be secret underwater superheroes. 
Photo from the Mie Prefecture Fisheries Institute
[via TYWKIWDBI]

archiemcphee:

This awesome creature is a Leptocephalus and it might just be the most perfectly transparent animal we’ve ever seen. According to all-knowing virtual guru that is Wikipedia, “Leptocephalus (meaning “slim head”) is the flat and transparent larva of the eel, marine eels, and other members of the Superorder Elopomorpha.”

We think they might also be secret underwater superheroes. 

Photo from the Mie Prefecture Fisheries Institute

[via TYWKIWDBI]

(via graphicareferencia)

August22013

johnny-worthington:

Hierodula salomonis, aka, the “Jade Mantis”, East Asia

Top - male; Bttm - female

beautiful faerie children of my heart.

(Source: prism-cloud, via cupsnake)

July292013

realmonstrosities:

This Cone Snail is a net-hunter. The net in question is a horrifically expandable mouth that engulfs prey in the most obscene way possible.

It looks like even its eye-stalks are spreading out all over the place!

Bigmouth strikes again, I guess…

source video

July132013

Titicaca Water Frog (Telmatobius culeus)

Also known as the Andean frog or Crawford’s water frog, the Titicaca water frog is a large species of frog found only in Lake Titicaca and its rivers in South America. Like other frogs the titicaca water frog feeds mostly on small fish, insects and other small invertebrates. The Titicaca water frog has excessive skin which is an adaptation for high altitude living as the excess skin helps it breathe, as more oxygen can diffuse in. It also possesses reduced lungs, a high red blood cell count and smaller red blood cells to help it breathe in its low oxygen environment. 

Phylogeny: Animalia-Chordata-Amphibia-Anura-Leptodactylidae-Telmatobiinae-Telmatobius-culeus. [Image Source(s)]

(Source: astronomy-to-zoology, via somuchscience)

June192013

bogleech:

Taonius is a deep-sea squid who swims with its tentacles held upright and can swivel its giant, owl-like eyes straight forward.

Its two larger whips have several different types of clawed sucker on them for getting a good grip on a wider range of prey.

May162013

oceanportal:

Sea butterflies, a group of swimming sea snails, are canaries in the coal mine for the ocean. Delicately beautiful and highly sensitive to the changing oceans, these tiny creatures—most smaller than a pinky nail!—present a unique way to gauge climate. One-quarter of the carbon dioxide we release into the atmosphere dissolves into the ocean, which makes the water more acidic and makes it more difficult for these animals to build their own shells.

Scientists at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History are studying them to learn how ocean acidification will affect a wide array of ocean animals. Read our article at Smithsonian Magazine about the animals and scientists studying themwith stunning photos.

All photos © Karen Osborn (Smithsonian biologist)